Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec – #67/365

It is an absolute privilege to be able to view Toulouse-Lautrec’s work up close. Not just for his energetic painting style, capturing the seedier side of Parisian nightlife, but also for his art direction and typography.

Over the years, there have been many articles about whether advertising can be art, and I’m pretty sure that it can’t be whilst it is selling something. I think it can transcend into art after it has served its purpose and becomes era defining.

In Lautrec’s case, I’ll make an exception, as he was already well known for being an artist when  he was commissioned to create posters for various clubs and salons.

Any art director or designer worth their salt should be aware of the influence of art in layout and design purely from a composition point of view.

In this Jane Avril example, I love the way he frames the poster using the double base. (How many ‘frames’ have we seen like this for contemporary brands?)

Obviously, Lautrec wasn’t a 19th century ‘ad man’. He was a brilliant artist and spent much of his time in Montmartre hanging out with philosophers, writers, artists and the like. Then popping off to brothels to draw/paint the staff and clientele. He was a reportage photographer before they’d even been invented. That, coupled with the eye of a poet, lead to some breathtakingly intimate works.

So, for inspiring a 17-year-old art student, Mr. Toulouse-Lautrec, I am very grateful.

ee8807c325b4223cab5d527a87f06cae

92b1fa6258034addd21aeff205c10bff

940c580da46b2f69f0f7f8e771b96a6f

92543665e61f562276662c4c3962247a

52de51dcd410109c44f2cf7618dfbd39

a1a90aefd1913afdfe7cf66995163000

2fa668011b93a60e5486d8c2c8e3fb4f

5897d1e25572d19116b2beb1890ceb39

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Advertisements

2 Comments

Filed under Art, Contemporary Arts, Creativity, Dance, Design, Disability, Ideas, Illustration, Innovation, Inspiration, Music, Philosophy, Poetry

2 responses to “Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec – #67/365

  1. I was blessed with the ability to draw from an early age and remember being enthralled by Lautrec’s work (Degas was another) and studiously studying and copying his style. Oblivious, of course, to the seedy subject matter of some of his pieces – I was 8 or 9 years old:) Another great post David.

  2. What a delightful post. What a delightful artist.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s