Reflections on Lockdown Summary

The purpose of this, and my previous five posts, was to see if the type of art I have been producing during lockdown is markedly different from the work I was doing last year when I was suffering from poor mental health.

The first point to consider is the reason for my improved mental health in the first place. This was primarily, (but not exclusively), due to me giving up alcohol. I am 413 days abstinent at the time of writing. And I have never felt better. Both physically and mentally.

Don’t worry, I haven’t suddenly become an anti-alcohol evangelist. Alcohol, like lots of things, is great if you use it properly. I didn’t. I misused it. I used it to self-medicate. To anaesthetise my perceived problems. The worse things got, the more I drank. The more I drank, the worse things got. In hindsight, it’s not difficult to see the trajectory of this coping strategy.

Now that I have given up drinking alcohol my mental health has soared. The first thing I noticed was my motivation to do things. (Which was sadly missing for the previous eight years or so.)

As a result of improved motivation, the second thing I noticed was just how prolific I was being!

But just because someone is producing a great quantity of work doesn’t mean that any of it is of great quality.

This goes back to the original question about the correlation of the type of art I am producing now versus last year. Yes, it has changed quite significantly. Has it improved? Well that is debatable and extremely subjective.

There is a lot of energy, emotion and raw power in some of the work I produced last year. You can see it here on Adieu 2019. But I am far happier producing the work I am today.

One of the questions I have wrestled with is not ‘is the art better?’, but ‘why am I doing it in the first place?’ The simple answer is – because I love it!

Since volunteering at Arc, I have learnt that the emphasis is on the act of doing rather than the end result. For me, creating art is about losing one’s self (or finding it) in the experience of manifesting something that didn’t previously exist. Being present. It is meditative, it’s cathartic, it’s therapeutic. Sure, it’s great if what you are producing turns out to be a masterpiece, but that isn’t the point of it. Also, I’d like to emphasise the ‘for me’ part. As I’m sure professional artists have a very different point of view to this. I am not trying to make a statement, merely channeling what I perceive to be my unconscious.

So, to summarise the summary:

Has my art changed since last year? Absolutely.

Has my productivity improved since last year? Ditto.

Has my mental health improved since last year? Immeasurably.

But, as previously mentioned, that is down to several factors: giving up alcohol, CBT, medication, art therapy and an amazing support network of health professionals, friends and family. Unlike the name of this blog, there has been lots of cavalry to the rescue.

And the most important question on your lips, I’m sure – what’s the significance of the illustrated symbols?

Well, they’re prophetic messages from an ancient alien civilisation dictated to me through my dreams.

Only kidding, I was just doodling.

If you, or someone you know, are experiencing mental health issues, call your GP or self refer to your local mental health team, (usually based at your local hospital).

If things are a bit more urgent than that you can call the Samaritans for free on 116 123. Or call the NHS on 111, they will treat your illness as seriously as they do any other.

If you want to see more of my photos and artwork follow me on Instagram: @milligancroft

6 Comments

Filed under Art, community, Contemporary Arts, Creativity, health, Ideas, Illustration, Innovation, Inspiration, love, Medicine, mental health, nhs, Philosophy, Uncategorized

6 responses to “Reflections on Lockdown Summary

  1. I am very happy to read this. Sometimes, in the midst of the daily opression of so much bad news, it is impossible to rise above it all and get a larger perspective, as you have done here, and to see that maybe, the trend is always to the good (I do believe that, although the path may be very very long and the definition of good flexible) if not always in a straight line. I love your introspections and they helped me today.
    I am struck by your symbol writings. It made me think of a blog I follow that discusses ancient writing systems. They have a educational resource for kids you might find fun – I did. https://crewsproject.wordpress.com/writing-in-the-ancient-world/

    • Hi Claudia, I’m glad my post has helped you in some way. It has been a very long and difficult road to recovery. One that has involved a great many people and thousands of pounds (dollars) of tax payers’ money. (We have a free health service. Well, it’s not free, we pay for it through taxes, but it’s free at the point of use.) I feel extremely fortunate to be alive today, and I treat each day as the blessing that it is. Good or bad. I hope I can repay the tax payers and the health service back through deeds. Thank you for the link, it looks fascinating. I did do a little bit of research around the Phoenician alphabet a few years ago. I’ll definitely download these – thank you. Have a lovely weekend. David.

  2. Congratulations on your journey to recovery. I honor it as a member of my family finally went to AA and has been sober for 30 years. Continue to live a long, sober life!

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