Tag Archives: terrorism

Terrorist or mentally ill?


Something has been on my mind this past month or so. And, after the tragic events that saw at least 84 people murdered in Nice yesterday, I feel compelled to write about it.

It’s not about the atrocity in Nice per se, but it is connected by how the perpetrator has – or will be – labelled by the media.

Thomas Mair – the man who murdered Labour MP Jo Cox – was immediately dubbed by the press as being mentally ill.

No doubt, the French-Tunisian man who killed 84 people in Nice will be dubbed a terrorist or Islamic extremist.

Why the difference in labels?

We know Thomas Mair had links to far right white supremacist groups. And we know that he called Jo Cox a ‘traitor’ because of her pro-EU stance. But still people say he must be mentally ill.

Why is a British white man who commits a politically motivated atrocity mentally ill, while an Arabic French man is a terrorist?

I’ll tell you why:

Because many British people share the same views as Thomas Mair.

They want England for English people. (And, by ‘English’, they mean ‘WASPs’: White Anglo Saxon Protestants. Not brown people who were born here. They don’t count.) They want foreigners out. They blame years of austerity measures on immigrants rather than the successive governments.

They don’t want to be identified as extremists or terrorists. So Thomas Mair’s mentally ill. He’s crazy. No normal person would do what he did.

Thomas Mair was radicalised by right wing groups like Britain First and the English Defence League. (As well as white supremacist groups in America.) I also believe that UKIP, Nigel Farage and other Brexiters who whipped up a storm of racial intolerance prior to the referendum had a role to play.

Hate crimes prior to, and following the referendum, were up 42% on previous years.

Are all these people mentally ill, or have they been radicalised?

Of course, I am not accusing all Brexiters of being right-wing-racist-radical-terrorists. Not even the majority of them. But some are.

And Thomas Mair definitely is.

It may well turn out that Thomas Mair does have a mental illness also. But that didn’t make him murder Jo Cox. His ideology did.

The man who murdered 84 people in Nice might have had a mental illness too. But I doubt he will be labelled as such.

Was what he did normal? Can any terrorist act be classed as normal behaviour? Are all terrorists mentally ill? Of course not.

Well, perhaps just the white British ones.

Obviously you don’t have to have brown skin to be a terrorist. You can have white skin. Particularly if it has an Irish accent attached to it.

But not pure, white English skin. Because “we” don’t do that whole terrorist thing.

It’s Jo Cox’s funeral today. RIP young lady. You were a shining beacon of hope in a dark world.

Britain Lawmaker Killed

An image and floral tributes for Jo Cox, lay on Parliament Square, outside the House of Parliament in London, Friday, June 17, 2016, after the 41-year-old British Member of Parliament was fatally injured Thursday in northern England. The mother of two young children was shot to death Thursday afternoon in her constituency near Leeds. A 52-year-old man has been arrested but has not been charged. He has been named locally as Tommy Mair. (AP Photo/Matt Dunham)

 

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The Diameter of the Bomb


I love France.

I’ve been there many times.

In fact, I love it so much, I’d even go as far as calling it my spiritual home.

I posted this poem a couple of years ago after the Boston bombing.

I can’t think of anything more poignant right now, other than to repost it in memory of all the people who lost their lives, not just in Paris, but also in Beirut and Egypt.

Red-White-Blue

 

The Diameter of the Bomb

by Yehuda Amichai

 

The diameter of the bomb was thirty centimeters

And the diameter of its effective range about seven meters,

With four dead and eleven wounded.

And around these, in a larger circle

Of pain and time, two hospitals are scattered

And one graveyard. But the young woman

Who was buried in the city she came from,

At a distance of more than a hundred kilometers,

Enlarges the circle considerably,

And the solitary man mourning her death

At the distant shores of a country far across the sea

Includes the entire world in the circle.

And I won’t even mention the crying of orphans

That reaches up to the throne of God and

Beyond, making

A circle with no end and no God.

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Inside the world of Love is Blood


Grasse, where Severine and Harry meet.

Grasse, where Severine and Harry meet.

One of the wonderful things about reading a good book is imagining the world that the author has created. I suspect every individual would visualise slightly different characters and the world in which they inhabit. Hopefully, mine is no different.

Whilst Love is Blood is not autobiographical, I have visited all of the locations featured in the novel. This obviously helps when trying to describe the settings in which the leading characters play out their story.

The characters themselves are not real people. They are amalgams of people I have met, invented or seen in movies. Their personalities are defined by the plot of the story. For example, both Harry and Dominic need to be creative, hopeless romantics and spontaneous, otherwise the story wouldn’t progress very far.

The three leading female characters are all strong, determined women. Severine is probably the most independent and decisive. Roísín starts out life being strong-willed and flamboyant, but, in later years, becomes slightly kooky. Sylvia, meanwhile, is the quietly sensitive type, noble and reflective.

Here are a few images that served as inspiration for the story. And, if they were all in their prime now, some actors/personalities I could imagine playing the lead roles.

If you haven’t read it yet, I’d appreciate your help in getting me up the Amazon chart. You can get a copy of it here: Love is Blood.

Love is blood, love story, David Milligan-Croft, romance

Liz Taylor as Severine?

Love is blood, romance, love story, David Milligan-Croft,

Liz Taylor

Love is blood, love story, David Milligan-Croft, romance

Cary Grant as Harry?

Love is blood, romance, love story, David Milligan-Croft

Audrey Hepburn as Sylvia?

Love is blood, romance, love story, David Milligan-Croft,

Or Emily Blunt as Sylvia?

Love is Blood, romance, love story, David Milligan-Croft

Lloyd Cole as Dominic?

Love is blood, romance, love story, David Milligan-Croft,

Gina McKee as Roísín?

Love is blood, romance, love story, David Milligan-Croft,

Dominic’s Sunbeam Tiger.

 

Love is blood, romance, love story, David Milligan-Croft,

Severine’s Citroën Pallas DS.

 

Love is blood, romance, love story, David Milligan-Croft,

Saint Paul de Vence, Cote d’Azur.

Love is blood, love story, romance, David Milligan-Croft,

Sartene, Corsica.

Love is blood, romance, love story, David Milligan-Croft,

Cargese, Corsica.

Love is Blood, romance, love story, David Milligan-Croft,

Irish Museum of Modern Art where Dominic works.

Love is blood, romance, love story, David Milligan-Croft,

Harry’s toy workshop?

Love is blood, romance, love story, David Milligan-Croft

Sylvia’s sketchbooks.

Love is Blood, love story, romance, David Milligan-Croft,

Severine’s villa in Grasse, Cote d’Azur.

Love is Blood, romance, love story, David Milligan-Croft,

Modigliani – inspiration for “Clatto”.

Picasso's 'art on paper' - Dominic's mission.

Picasso’s ‘art on paper’ – Dominic’s mission.

Love is blood, romance, love story, David Milligan-Croft.

The Empire State Building, New York.

love is blood, love story, romance, incest, David Milligan-Croft,

Help me make it Number 1!

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My debut novel: Love is Blood – out now on Amazon.


Hi everyone,

Well, my debut novel, Love is Blood, is now available on Amazon.

Love is Blood is a romantic novel about how one cataclysmic act of terrorism causes a chain reaction changing the course of history. It’s about how fate conspires to bring two lovers together from different backgrounds, countries and continents who, unbeknownst to them, may share the same father.

The story alternates chapter by chapter between 1969 and the year 2000.

In the year 2000, Dominic Grant meets Sylvia de la Fouchon by chance when a terrorist bomb at Charles de Gaulle airport causes traffic control mayhem around France. If it weren’t for a Corsican terrorist, seeking revenge for the death of his fiance, Dominic would have caught an earlier flight, never having met Sylvia.

The pair embark on a passionate affair, but as their story unfolds we begin to suspect that the couple may have more in common than they realise. Both Sylvia and Dominic never knew their fathers and, as they learn more about each other, we are faced with the terrifying prospect that the two lovers are possibly half-brother and sister and may have committed incest.

Intertwined with their relationship; set in 1969, we follow the clandestine life of toy designer, Harry Grant. He has a troubled relationship at home in Dublin and a mistress in the South of France. Harry ultimately agrees to elope to America with his enigmatic and seductive French mistress. He leaves his pregnant wife in Dublin, but will his mistress turn up at the top of the Empire State Building? Or will Harry be left to build a new life in New York alone?

The novel shows how events beyond human control overlap to shape the key protagonists’ destiny. Ultimately coming full circle, when the Corsican terrorist, whose actions brought Sylvia and Dominic together, is the one Sylvia confides in for advice. She goes to visit him in prison to discuss why he did what he did, and the consequences it had, not just for them, but for everyone.

Love is Blood is not just two passionate, intertwining love stories, but a cosmic journey about how interrelated everything and everyone in the universe actually is.

Obviously, I’d be extremely happy if you popped along to Amazon and purchased a copy of it. (Just click on the links above or the cover image.) But, if it’s not your thing, any extra publicity about it by sharing would be greatly appreciated.

Don’t worry if you don’t have a Kindle device. You can download the Kindle App directly onto your Mac or PC.

To download Kindle for PC click here.

To download Kindle for Mac click here.

Love is Blood, David Milligan-Croft, writer,

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The Diameter of the Bomb – Yehuda Amichai


In light of yesterday’s bombings in Boston, this poem seems all the more poignant. Thank you to Asha Mokashi for sharing it.

The Diameter of the Bomb

by Yehuda Amichai

 

The diameter of the bomb was thirty centimeters

And the diameter of its effective range about seven meters,

With four dead and eleven wounded.

And around these, in a larger circle

Of pain and time, two hospitals are scattered

And one graveyard. But the young woman

Who was buried in the city she came from,

At a distance of more than a hundred kilometers,

Enlarges the circle considerably,

And the solitary man mourning her death

At the distant shores of a country far across the sea

Includes the entire world in the circle.

And I won’t even mention the crying of orphans

That reaches up to the throne of God and

Beyond, making

A circle with no end and no God.

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Haiku for Norway


Utoeya

Bullets rain
Like spruce needles,
Where children cannot hide.

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O-magh


OMAGH

If “Om” is the Sanskrit word
For the sound of the Universe vibrating,
Then “Omagh”, is the sound of it grieving.

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